Recent Changes

Tuesday, April 15

  1. page The 5 Exemplary Practices of Leadership edited According to The Leadership Challenge by Kouzes and Posner, there are five exemplary practices of…

    According to The Leadership Challenge by Kouzes and Posner, there are five exemplary practices of leadership, which are outlined below:
    {5_practices_new.JPG}
    These practices are recognized by leaders as important because they show that leadership, "is not about personality; it's about behavior" (Kouzes and Posner 15). Although there are many different types of people with different personalities, which result in the manifestation of a large range of diverse leadership styles, Kouzes and Posner predict that the five elements they set forth can help any person become a more effective leader. A leader may embody certain characteristics more than others, but there is not one exemplary practice that is better or best; they all have strengths to guide a group through the process known as leadership.
    ...
    of modeling the{Gandhi_studio_1931.jpg} the way is
    ...
    direction of {Gandhi_studio_1931.jpg} the people
    The second practice is Inspiring a Shared Vision. Important questions a leader must ask is, "where are we going?" and "is that where we want to go?" After asking these things, if the group is headed in a direction that is not right for the group, then a leader must inspire a vision for the group. To do this, a leader must first envision the future. by brainstorming other potential directions the group could go and other possibilities the group. could pursue. There is an African proverb that states, "For tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today". This proverb is an important lesson for leaders who follow the exemplary practice of inspiring a shared vision because a leader cannot just expect their vision to happen. Inspiring a shared vision for a group requires action and a robust understanding of group dynamics. To bring about full commitment of a group to a shared a vision, a leader must enlist others by involving group members in planning, encouraging them to take action, a sharing visions as they are created along the way. If all members of a group are not all on the same page, chaos will result. Thi s will in turn cause the group to be less effective and possibly lose sight of its goals. It is important to understand that as a leader, what may be meaningful to you as an individual may not be the same as what is meaningful to the group. on the other hand, though, by sharing with others your personal visions, others may agree with you and group harmony may result.
    The third practice is Challenge the Process. Challenging the Process is not just rebelling against the current process or organization structure of a group. This practice requires recognizing what works for a group and what does not. It requires seeking opportunities which will allow the group to grow and become more effective. When you search for new opportunities, it means you are admitting that change is good and is often needed. Many people in groups fear change and prefer systematic work; but in this environment, work becomes too routine and growth and improvement is difficult to bring about. And when this occurs, groups become less effective. Challenging the process puts leaders in tough positions where they might often feel alone in their attempts to try and explain/persuade why a change is needed to a group; but this can also be positive since it can lead to experimentation and the taking of risks. Without taking risks, change never occurs. There must be a willingness to sometimes make mistakes as long as these mistakes result from taking risks which could potentially greatly benefit a group's situation. In other worlds, when a leader challenges the process of a group or organization, mistakes are okay if the group learns from those mistakes and does not repeat the same mistakes again. Change is a step by step process and little changes add up over time. It is important to remember, Rome was not built in a day. An example of an organization that recognizes the importance of taking risk is the Church Resource Ministries, also known as CRM, which is an organization which empowers leaders in over thirty-five countries. CRM explains in their mission the problems that would exist as a result of a culture where there was no risk:
    ...
    Taken from: http://www.crmleaders.org/home/resources/quikfacts/quikfacts-articles/qf-take-risk
    The fourth practice is Enable Others to Act. This aspect of the five exemplary practices focuses on attention to the group. A leader must seek out individuals and create roles for those individuals so that they can grow personally, as well as benefit the group. A group must work cohesively towards a common goal. A good way to make a group more effective to foster collaboration. For example, a leader may delegate certain tasks to all members of the group, even to those who may not hold formal, official leadership positions. By allowing each member to take ownership of a task, all constituents will be made to feel important. People enjoy doing their work when they feel their work is important to the group, and when you have members of a group who enjoy doing their work, they will be happier and more willing to collaborate with one another. Another important aspect of enabling others to act is creating an environment where leaders strengthens others. This requires enhancing others' self-determination and developing their competence and confidence (Kouzes & Posner 251). When members of a group are confident and feel like they have power, they will be more willing to work toward the common goal without complaint. People who feel inspired to take action are capable of accomplishing amazing goals. People develop a sense of flow which results in tasks they normally might not have been able to complete, becoming more and more simple. In psychology, this concept is called planting the golden seed. Leaders must plant this golden seed by empowering others and telling them they believe in them. When an individual knows someone believes in them, they become more willing to work toward achieving a goal.
    The{emerson.jpg}
    The
    fifth practice
    ...
    Ralph Waldo Emerson,Emerson {200px-RWEmerson2.jpg} an
    Strengths
    With five practices of leadership to discuss, and two commitments per practice, this leadership model might be seen as extremely thorough
    (view changes)
    11:22 am
  2. file emerson.jpg uploaded
    11:20 am
  3. file emerson.jpg uploaded
    11:20 am
  4. 11:17 am
  5. 11:16 am
  6. page The 5 Exemplary Practices of Leadership edited ... Taken from: http://www.crmleaders.org/home/resources/quikfacts/quikfacts-articles/qf-take-risk…
    ...
    Taken from: http://www.crmleaders.org/home/resources/quikfacts/quikfacts-articles/qf-take-risk
    The fourth practice is Enable Others to Act. This aspect of the five exemplary practices focuses on attention to the group. A leader must seek out individuals and create roles for those individuals so that they can grow personally, as well as benefit the group. A group must work cohesively towards a common goal. A good way to make a group more effective to foster collaboration. For example, a leader may delegate certain tasks to all members of the group, even to those who may not hold formal, official leadership positions. By allowing each member to take ownership of a task, all constituents will be made to feel important. People enjoy doing their work when they feel their work is important to the group, and when you have members of a group who enjoy doing their work, they will be happier and more willing to collaborate with one another. Another important aspect of enabling others to act is creating an environment where leaders strengthens others. This requires enhancing others' self-determination and developing their competence and confidence (Kouzes & Posner 251). When members of a group are confident and feel like they have power, they will be more willing to work toward the common goal without complaint. People who feel inspired to take action are capable of accomplishing amazing goals. People develop a sense of flow which results in tasks they normally might not have been able to complete, becoming more and more simple. In psychology, this concept is called planting the golden seed. Leaders must plant this golden seed by empowering others and telling them they believe in them. When an individual knows someone believes in them, they become more willing to work toward achieving a goal.
    ...
    gain invaluable knowledeknowledge in this
    Strengths
    With five practices of leadership to discuss, and two commitments per practice, this leadership model might be seen as extremely thorough
    (view changes)
    9:11 am
  7. page STARS edited ... 4. Responsibility 5. Standards {Stars.jpg} {slide.001.jpg} If we work toward adopting t…
    ...
    4. Responsibility
    5. Standards
    {Stars.jpg} {slide.001.jpg}
    If we work toward adopting these five values into our everyday lives, we believe we can become more effective leaders. The following is an analysis of each value as it relates specifically to the STARS Model of Leadership, as well as examples of where these values can be found in the other emergent leadership models.
    We have chosen service as the first aspect of our leadership model because as a group, we could not agree more with the fact that “true leadership emerges from those whose primary motivation is a deep desire to help others” (Spears 11). What stands out to us most when it comes to servant leadership is, unlike many of the authors of the leadership books on the shelf at Barnes and Noble, proponents of servant leadership do not suggest that it is a “quick fix approach” (Spears 12); rather, they suggest that “at its core, servant leadership is a long-term, transformational approach to life and work - in essence, a way of being - that has the potential for creating positive change throughout our society” (Spears 12). Through three of its ten principles, listening, empathy, and awareness, servant leadership encompasses the Relational Leadership Model’s idea of "Inclusion." In order to create an inclusive environment for those you are attempting to serve, leaders must be good listeners, possess a desire to relate to others and look at things from others’ points of view, and have a willingness not only to be aware of oneself and others, but to encourage others to be aware of one another, as well. Also, through its principle of commitment to the growth of people, servant leadership encompasses the practice of "Strengthening Others" under "Enabling Others to Act" from The 5 Exemplary Practices of Leadership. In other words, a commitment to service leads to a commitment to the growth and strengthening of others, which in turn leads to others, who might otherwise be reluctant to act, becoming enabled and encouraged to act and make a difference.
    (view changes)
    9:09 am
  8. page STARS edited ... 4. Responsibility 5. Standards {slide.001.jpg} {Stars.jpg} {slide.001.jpg} If we work …
    ...
    4. Responsibility
    5. Standards
    {slide.001.jpg}{Stars.jpg} {slide.001.jpg}
    If we work toward adopting these five values into our everyday lives, we believe we can become more effective leaders. The following is an analysis of each value as it relates specifically to the STARS Model of Leadership, as well as examples of where these values can be found in the other emergent leadership models.
    We have chosen service as the first aspect of our leadership model because as a group, we could not agree more with the fact that “true leadership emerges from those whose primary motivation is a deep desire to help others” (Spears 11). What stands out to us most when it comes to servant leadership is, unlike many of the authors of the leadership books on the shelf at Barnes and Noble, proponents of servant leadership do not suggest that it is a “quick fix approach” (Spears 12); rather, they suggest that “at its core, servant leadership is a long-term, transformational approach to life and work - in essence, a way of being - that has the potential for creating positive change throughout our society” (Spears 12). Through three of its ten principles, listening, empathy, and awareness, servant leadership encompasses the Relational Leadership Model’s idea of "Inclusion." In order to create an inclusive environment for those you are attempting to serve, leaders must be good listeners, possess a desire to relate to others and look at things from others’ points of view, and have a willingness not only to be aware of oneself and others, but to encourage others to be aware of one another, as well. Also, through its principle of commitment to the growth of people, servant leadership encompasses the practice of "Strengthening Others" under "Enabling Others to Act" from The 5 Exemplary Practices of Leadership. In other words, a commitment to service leads to a commitment to the growth and strengthening of others, which in turn leads to others, who might otherwise be reluctant to act, becoming enabled and encouraged to act and make a difference.
    (view changes)
    9:08 am
  9. file Stars.jpg uploaded
    9:08 am
  10. file 4-06a.jpg uploaded
    9:07 am

More